“Skin-and-Bones Animal Discovery: Police Investigation Reveals Owner’s Inhumane Treatment”

In February of 2016, the Royal Society for the Protection of Animals (RSPCA) received word about a severely malnourished dog in need of rescue. The pooch was so emaciated that it weighed a mere 10kg – less than half of what is considered a healthy weight for its breed. The RSPCA team managed to successfully save the animal, which has since been dubbed “the world’s thinnest dog ever rescued.”
Upon undergoing thorough medical examinations, it was determined that the dog’s skeletal appearance was not the result of any illness or ailment, but rather due to severe starvation. The veterinary professionals gave the dog the name “Ned” and ensured that it received proper care.

Detecting the thin animal with only skin and bones, the police immediately investigated and discovered the truth about the woman who abused the poison - Photo 1.

Detecting the thin animal with only skin and bones, the police immediately investigated and discovered the truth about the woman who abused the poison - Photo 2.

Detecting the thin animal with only skin and bones, the police immediately investigated and discovered the truth about the woman who abused the animal - Photo 3.

- Photo 1.

The photos depict Ned, a dog who was saved by members of the RSPCA in a severely emaciated condition. An investigation revealed that his owner, Marie Staniforth, who resided in Holmrook, Cumbria (England) and was 32 years old at the time, had intentionally starved Ned, leading to his dire state. Despite repeated denials and false claims of finding a lost dog, Marie was eventually held accountable for her cruel actions.

- Photo 2.

The previously mistreated canine is currently relishing in joyful moments with its fresh caretaker. Marie Staniforth faced charges of animal abuse and was given a prison sentence of 18 weeks, along with being prohibited from owning pets. Additionally, she had to pay £80 as compensation to the victim at West Cumbria Magistrate Court located in Workington.

- Photo 3.

At last, fortune shone down on the tiny canine. Following his rescue, Ned was transported to a charitable organization for medical attention. Various dog enthusiasts came forward and provided food and affection for the unfortunate pup. Martyn Fletcher, an officer from the RSPCA, stated that Ned was adopted by a well-off family and befriended three other dogs. He further added that this was the perfect home for Ned and during the court proceedings, he was vacationing at sea with his newfound family. In light of his newfound luck, it would be more appropriate to rename him Lucky!

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